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All About the Hula Hoe

A hula hoe, also known as a stirrup hoe, is a handy tool for removing weeds in tight spaces between rows of vegetables or flowers. Since the hula hoe cuts weeds under the soil where the roots are, the weeds have less of a chance of growing back. This will save you time and energy in the long run.

Closeup of dandelions in a garden.

So, which hula hoe is the best? I’ve listed the top seven for you. Keep reading to find out more about this unique garden tool!

What Is a Hula Hoe?

A hula hoe is similar to a regular hoe with a long handle, but the blade is shaped like a stirrup. It gets the name “hula” from the motion it makes under the soil, wiggling back and forth. This motion simultaneously cuts weeds at the root and cultivates the soil.

A hula hoe, also known as a stirrup hoe.

Now we’ll present our selections for the seven best hula, or stirrup, hoes you can buy for your garden space.

The Seven Best Hula Hoes


Best Overall

Hoss Stirrup Hoe

My top pick is the Hoss Stirrup Hoe for its durability. The powder-coated steel blade oscillates 20 degrees in both directions when you move it back and forth. The ash hardwood handle is a generous 60 inches long, which is great for taller gardeners. It’s one of the most expensive hula-style hoes on the market, but it comes with a one-year warranty and easy access to replacement parts through their website.

Pros:

  • It’s made in the U.S.A. from durable materials.
  • The large, heavy-duty blade cuts larger weeds easily.
  • It has a long handle.

Cons:

  • It’s more expensive than other hula hoes.

Best for Sandy Soil

Flexrake 1000L Hula-Ho Weeder

Flexrake 1000L Hula-Ho Weeder Cultivator with 54-Inch Wood Handle

The Flexrake stand-up hula hoe has a 54-inch wood handle with a blade that’s heat-treated and self-sharpening. This hula hoe is lightweight while maintaining its ability to easily uproot weeds.

Pros:

  • It’s lightweight and easy to use.
  • The blade is self-sharpening.
  • Flexrake has replacement blades you can purchase.

Cons:

  • The handle is not long enough for some users.

Best Miniature Hula Hoe

Flexrake 500W Hula-Ho Mini Flexrake

Flexrake 500W Hula-Ho Mini Flexrake Hula-Ho with 14-Inch Wood Handle

The Flexrake miniature hula hoe is similar in build and materials to its big brother. The blade is only about 3.75-inches wide, which is great for the smallest of spaces. It’s best used on small to medium weeds in sandy or loamy soil.

Pros:

  • Small blade allows weeding in tight spots.
  • It’s lightweight.
  • It’s made in the U.S.A.

Cons:

  • It doesn’t work well in heavy soil.

Best for Comfortable Grip

AMES 1985450 Mini Action Hoe

AMES 1985450 Mini Action Hoe with Hardwood Handle and Cushion Grip, 14 Inch

This miniature hula hoe has a 14-inch wooden handle with a comfortable grip attached. The cushioned grip works well for stabilizing the hoe and relieving your hands of any potential blisters. It has a 3.625-inch blade that’s perfect for weeding in small gardens and raised beds.

Pros:

  • It has a cushioned grip.
  • The wood handle is durable and lightweight.
  • It works well for raised beds.

Cons:

  • It doesn’t work well on large weeds or in heavy soil.

Best for Quick Weeding

AMES 2825800 Action Hoe

AMES 2825800 Action Hoe with Hardwood Handle, 58-Inch

The AMES stand-up hula hoe has a 54-inch wooden handle attached to a 6-inch double blade head. This hula hoe stands out because of the shape of the head, which is more triangular than any other brand. The triangular shape encourages precision when weeding.

Pros:

  • It has a comfortable grip.
  • The triangular head helps make precise movements.
  • The double-edged blade cuts down weeding time.

Cons:

  • The wooden handle was rough for some users.

Best Hula Hoe with Fiberglass Handle

Bond Manufacturing LH022 Stirrup Hoe

Bond Manufacturing LH022 Anti-fouling Fiberglass Garden, Red

The Bond Manufacturing hula hoe is a great cost-friendly option. The fiberglass handle cuts the usual price for hula hoes in half, while still being a durable choice with a good steel-blade head. It comes with a three-year warranty, so you can rest assured in making this purchase.

Pros:

  • It’s budget-friendly.
  • It’s lightweight and easy to use.
  • It comes with a warranty.

Cons

  • The handle-grip is not very durable and may need replacement after repeated use.

Best for Medium Height Gardeners

True Temper 2866300 Looped Action Hoe Cultivator

True Temper 2866300 Looped Action Hoe Cultivator with 54 in. Hardwood Handle with Cushion Grip, Pack of 1

The True Temper hula hoe has a 54-inch hardwood handle with a cushioned grip that works great for short to medium-height gardeners. The looped, steel blade is heavy-duty enough to cut through large weeds, while still being lightweight.

Pros:

  • It’s built in the U.S.A.
  • It has a comfortable cushioned grip.
  • The steel blade is durable.

Cons:

  • It doesn’t work well for some taller gardeners.

How to Choose a Hula Hoe

Blade Size

Hula hoes come in varying sizes of blade heads. To decide which one you need, take a look at your garden. How large are the areas between your rows and around your plants? For a compact garden or raised bed, a smaller blade head would a great choice.

Handle Length

The hula hoe comes in a stand-up version and a miniature version. The stand-up versions have handles similar to a normal hoe, measuring anywhere from 50 to 60-inches. Miniature versions have small handles around 12-inches long that allow you to weed while kneeling in your garden. The miniature hoe is handy for weeding small areas while you’re already tending to or harvesting from your garden.

Woman using a long-handled garden tool for weeding a garden.

Handle Materials

You can find the hula hoe with a handle made from wood, aluminum, or steel. Wood and steel handles typically cost more than aluminum but will likely last more growing seasons. Aluminum or fiberglass handles are great for beginner gardeners just looking to test out this kind of hoe.

How to Use a Hula Hoe

To use a hula hoe effectively, simply place the hoe where the weeds are and move it back and forth. The stirrup-shaped head will wiggle as you do this. You don’t have to lift the hoe from the soil. Just keep it at surface level when moving it, and the weeds should come right up.

Take extra precautions if you have drip irrigation installed below the surface, as this tool could easily damage it on accident.

When to Use a Hula Hoe

It’s a good idea to use the hula every week during the growing season. This will eliminate any weeds trying to grow around your vegetables. If weeds get too large, their root systems will compete with other vegetable plants, stealing their space and nutrition from the soil.

Person weeding a garden with a long-handled tool in the background.

How to Maintain Your Hula Hoe

Always clean your hula hoe after use to avoid spreading any kind of plant disease. You can clean it using a brush or spray hose. If you get the blade wet, just make sure to dry it completely to avoid rust.

It’s also important to keep your hoe blade sharp so that it’s the most effective at cutting weeds. Some models are self-sharpening, while some will need to be manually sharpened with a file.

Try Out a Hula Hoe in Your Garden This Year!

If your garden has been overtaken by weeds, purchasing a hula hoe is a great route to take. You can easily (and quickly!) remove any unwanted weeds around your vegetables or flowers. My top pick for the best hula hoe is the Hoss Stirrup Hoe because of its durability. But, if you’d rather have a miniature version, I’ve listed some of those as well!

A woman wearing gardening gloves, holding a garden weed.

Hula hoes are just one kind of tool that makes gardening tasks easier. To learn more, we invite you to visit our Digging Tools page for ideas that will inspire you to add a few new tools your garden collection!